roof types and maintenance procedures

Roof maintenance is a great home improvement project to be doing on a routine basis. Without it, your roof is bound to break down. The idea behind it is to arrest problems before they occur, something you don’t want happening as roof problems can be quite a headache, never mind an expensive affair.

However, routine maintenance procedures need only be an annual thing, or twice a year utmost if you live in an area where the weather is unforgiving. And maintenance in this case could entail something as simple as a roof inspection, probably cleaning. So, if you find yourself performing frequent roof repairs, then something’s not right.

Sometimes, the type of roof you have in place could be the reason behind the frequent roof problems you may be experiencing.

That’s right.

While a certain roof type may appeal to you for its aesthetics, it may not be ideal in your geographic location. Certain weather conditions could lead to a roof dilapidating faster than they really should. So, while the decision ultimately lies with you when it comes to roofing your house, it never hurts to consult a roof contractor on the best options available.

Following are some of the roof types you can choose from:

Asphalt Shingles

On average, shingles may last about 20 years or so, although the higher-quality ones can have a warranty extending to even 50 years. Asphalt shingles remain one of the most popular roofing materials, with their price ranging from moderately priced to relatively inexpensive.

They are mostly preferred in windy areas, although strong winds may pull up some shingles over time. Their build means they can withstand fires, but they tend to peel upwards in more humid climates, losing their effectiveness in the process.

Wood Shingles

These are 100 percent natural and are easily recycled. As you would guess, wood shingles don’t offer a good defense against fires, although they can be treated with fire retardant – a must-do if you have wood shingles in place.

Moderately priced, this type of roof can handle wind pretty well. Their huge downside is that they call for periodic maintenance and may need to be replaced more often compared to the other types.

Metal Roofs

Metal roofs are costlier than asphalt, although more durable. They can hold up well against strong winds and fire as well.

People tend to associate metal roofs with commercial buildings, but they can also be suitable for residential roofs. For a more sleek look, try having them installed with seamless fasteners.

They come with the added bonus of being recyclable.

Clay Tiles

In terms of aesthetics, clay tiles tick the box – although this comes at a cost.

As much as they may last long in the right conditions, they tend to be extremely brittle which means they are a definite no-no in some locations, especially the windy and areas that experience high precipitation.

You’ll mostly find clay roofing tiles in Mediterranean-style homes, and they are a standard in countries like Italy and Spain. They are ideal in dry climates and can also withstand fires, and this explains why they remain a go-to roofing material in the American southwest.

Concrete Tiles

The level of protection concrete roofs provide is similar to clay tiles. They are costly, but not as much as their clay counterparts.

You can alter the color of the concrete to give the roof a wooden appearance.

Plastic Polymer

This type of roof is made to resemble slate or wood panels, and tends to be extremely light.

They are fairly affordable, and although manufacturers may market them as long-lasting, polymer blend roofs are not a material you want to use in areas notorious for harsh elements.

Last Word

Consulting an established local roof contractor can ensure you choose the right type of roof for your home or business, suited to the climatic conditions of your area.

This will help minimize the need for repair and maintenance in between procedures, ensuring your roof is both practical and aesthetically-pleasing, while saving you substantial amounts over the years.